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Rachel Kéké, from the Ibis Batignolles at the Assembly


A deputy maid? The candidacy inspires. Saturday, May 8, at the Nupes convention, the public cheers him standing during his fiery speech. The day after her inauguration, Rachel Kéké cannot believe the enthusiasm aroused: “It was, as the young people say, a crazy thing! »

On the way to Stains, to the general meeting of a group of activists from working-class neighborhoods, the parliamentary candidate scrolls through viral videos of her speech on her phone. We see her again adorned with her purple bazin, the festive African outfit I wore on the day of the signing of the end of the conflict», she specifies.

“Subcontracting is abuse”

This conflict is the one that pitted the chambermaids of the Ibis hotel in Batignolles against the powerful Accor group and its cleaning subcontractor, STN. In July 2019, she embarked with thirty-three employees, supported by the CGT-HPE (prestige and budget hotels), in a struggle to demand decent working conditions and remuneration.

On the picket lines, a formula was born: “Subcontracting is abuse. » Those who refer to themselves as “the warriors of the Batignolles” denounce the infernal pace, transfers, unpaid overtime, sexual assault, including a rape allegedly committed by a former hotel manager.

At the end of a twenty-two month struggle, including eight months of strike, they snatch between 250 and 500 euros in salary increase, a basket bonus and the end of room work for payment by the hour. . “99% of our demands”as the governess likes to repeat. “Wrestling pays off! » Victory is beyond them: “Journalists came from Japan to interview us! »

Since then, Rachel Kéké has joined insubordinate France because she believes that “their teams were there until the victory”. That Sunday, the candidate is invited to meet the autonomous collective We get involved, which had called to vote Popular Union in the first round of the presidential election. In the municipal theater, the reunion is warm with Ahmed Berrahal, comrade of the CGT-RATP.

His verve and his sense of anaphora

Very soon after the presentation of the program, the 47-year-old activist takes the microphone in front of the approximately 200 participants: “It’s us, the people from working-class neighborhoods, the women of immigrant origin, it’s us who do these essential jobs. » With her verve and her sense of anaphora, the trade unionist carries the room in the same fervor as the day before.

It’s time to go to the National Assembly to say stop and to pass concrete laws! »

Rachel Keke

Arrived in Paris at the age of 26, the young Ivorian has multiplied the galleys to regularize her situation, find housing and stable work. The mother of five knows the difficulties faced by “outsourced moms and dads” who chain jobs on staggered hours, with large amplitudes, for poverty wages. “This situation does not give us the means to educate our children in our neighborhoods. So, it’s time to go to the National Assembly to say stop and to pass concrete laws! »

“Anyway, we have no choice, we have to fight! »

But the battle is not won in advance. In 2017, in the first round of the legislative elections, the liberal bloc (LaREM, LR, DVD) won more than 60% of the votes in the constituency which includes the municipalities of Chevilly-Larue, Fresnes, L’Haÿ-les-Roses, Thiais and Rungis. Abstention reached 52%. Jean-Jacques Bridey (LaREM, ex-PS) won against Republican Vincent Jeanbrun. The very right-handed mayor of L’Haÿ-les-Roses is back.

To replace the outgoing deputy, who is dragging pans linked to exorbitant food costs and a case of embezzlement of public funds, Macronie has chosen to parachute the Minister of Sports, Roxana Maracineanu. But the political landscape has evolved since 2017: except at Rungis, Mélenchon came first everywhere in the first round of the presidential election in a constituency generally on the right. It achieves a surprising breakthrough, between 8 and 11 points, compared to 2017.

“Anyway, we have no choice, we have to fight! » clearly launches the resident of Chevilly-Larue who wants to lead a joyful campaign. His first bill? “Revalue all the essential trades. I fought Accor, I will be able to stand up to the Minister of Labor, if necessary “, she says on the way back. She leaves with the support of the collective and her colleagues. Proud, legitimate and determined, Rachel Kéké is on her way to prolong the fight.


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