COVID-19 vaccine side effects less likely in pregnant women, study finds

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A new Canadian study suggests that pregnant women experienced lower rates of health problems after receiving the COVID-19 vaccine than their non-pregnant counterparts.

The Canadian National Vaccine Safety Network collected data from 191,360 vaccinated women aged 15 to 49 between December 2020 and November 2021.

Researchers asked participants to report « significant health events » that were severe enough to cause them to miss school or work, see a doctor, or disrupt their routines.

Of 5,597 pregnant participants, 4% reported a significant health problem within seven days of receiving their first dose of an mRNA vaccine, and 7.3% of 3,108 pregnant respondents reported experiencing side effects following their second injection.

Among those who were not pregnant, 6.3% of the 174,765 respondents reported a significant health problem after the first dose, and 11.3% of the 10,254 participants reported feeling sick after the second dose. .

Dr Julie Bettinger, lead author of the Lancet Infectious Diseases paper, says the findings are « unexpected » and warrant further investigation.

« Previous studies of other vaccines in pregnant women have mostly reported no significant differences in health events between pregnant and non-pregnant women or found higher rates during pregnancy, » Bettinger said. , a researcher at BC Children’s Hospital, in a news release Thursday.

“Further studies of non-COVID-19 mRNA vaccines are needed to determine whether the reduction in side effects observed in pregnant women in this study is a feature of the mRNA vaccine platform or of these specific vaccines.

This report from The Canadian Press was first published on August 12, 2022.

The Canadian Press



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